Archives for posts with tag: photos

One of the most common questions on the Web right now (at least among people in the U.S.), is “Where can I watch the presidential inauguration online?”

Not only will a live stream be on the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies site on Jan. 20, just about every media outlet is planning to air live video of the swearing-in and inaugural address, scheduled for noon E.T., and some are scheduled to begin as early as 8 a.m. ET

Among those with plans:

Got an iPhone or iPod Touch? UStream and Joost offer livestream apps. To get the UStream app, which will include chat capability, email iphone@ustream.tv. The Joost app is on iTunes now. For desktop viewing, go to the Everything Obama channel.

And as this election was the most socially networked in history, it only makes sense that the inauguration will be too.

Log in on Flickr and grab their photoedited slideshow to put it on your site, like so:

What plans does your outlet have for online coverage? Add a link in comments.

Photo: Courtesy of Pete Souza

As news organizations, watchdogs and voters prepare for the Super Bowl of politics, it seemed like a good idea to survey what will be online for Nov. 4.

Some sites will start their coverage early. Already, the massive, all-volunteer Twitter Vote Report has been logging and mapping voting problems and good experiences.

Most complaints so far have been about long wait times and registration confusion. To participate, send a tweet with the #votereport hashtag.

New to Twitter? Not on Twitter? There are other ways to send a report. Developer Nathan Freitas has come up with some additional ways to look through the data.

At 6 a.m. ET on Election Day, the Washington Post will begin tracking voter experiences and related national news on their Vote Monitor page. To participate and to send news tips, post a Twitter message to PostVoteMonitor.

In addition, WaPo has interactive maps, live discussions, blogging and articles peppered around its site and on their politics page. Be sure to have a look at the very cool TimeSpace map and timeline mashup.

The New York Times just announced a slew of goodies for election coverage. A very handy tool for those who want to jockey returns is the pop-up dashboard, which will include live election returns beginning at 6 p.m. ET, as well as electoral vote tallies from network news, CNN and the Associated Press.

The Grey Lady is also trying to create the largest online archive of polling place photographs taken by voters. Add your photo to the mix under a Creative Commons license on the Polling Places page.

Addicted to Flickr? Editors at Yahoo News will be culling election-related photos from the site and posting them on yahoo.com and news.yahoo.com. Put the word “election” somewhere in the title, comment or tag to be part of the search.

If you’re going to be out and about, bookmark the Online NewsHour’s mobile site. In addition to updates on the election, there’s a handy list of poll closing times and electoral votes.

NPR political analyst Ken Rudin has predicted Obama will win the race, but as we know, it ain’t over till it’s over. Want to map your own hypothetical outcome? Check out the You Predict map. The NewsHour will begin its TV broadcast at 9 p.m. ET, but you can follow developing coverage online now.

The Star-News may create the longest CoverItLive transcript ever with its Election Day live blog, which begins at 6:30 a.m. ET. The Wilmington, N.C., news organization reports record early voting returns in several counties. Thousands more are expected at the polls tomorrow.

STLToday.com, the website of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, will have their reporters and photographers out in force, documenting any polling problems that may occur. In addition, they’ll be streaming Qik video from separate Democratic and Republican election parties, blogging and posting staff and reader photos. The content will go live Tuesday afternoon. Keep tabs on the coverage at www.stltoday.com/news/politics.

On the West Coast, the popular L.A. Times blogs Top of the Ticket and L.A. Now will be posting updates throughout the day. Around 4 p.m. PT, the homepage will flip from the usual center art surrounded by story links to an electoral map that will track returns for the presidential race as well as 12 hotly contested propositions. Sometime after, the site will launch a separate section on California.

MSNBC will be revamping its homepage for elections coverage. Before then, you can embed a customizable live results widget like the one below on your site.

Photo by Hilary McHone/Flickr

The National Association of Hispanic Journalists hosted a multimedia workshop at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism earlier today.

It’s one of the newest schools in the country, built within the walls of the former New York Herald Tribune, and running since fall 2006.

Not many people have been there yet, so here’s a look around the lobby.

A photo montage on one of the walls had a quote that seems especially appropriate, given the speed at which news flows online. Click it to see more pictures from inside the school.

CUNY announced Friday that it will offer continuing education classes to its alumni for a small fee.

Constant learning is always a good thing, and given the facility, its equipment and its instructors, dedicated alumni are likely to seize the opportunity.

Will Sullivan of Journerdism pointed to an incredible film on the Toronto Star website.

Shot by staff photojournalist Lucas Oleniuk and composed entirely of still images, the film — that’s right, film — “Airsick” calls on Star readers to join with other cities worldwide in shutting off all lights for an hour March 29, an action that’s meant to bring attention to human impact on climate change.

The Earth Hour idea was first proposed last year by the Sydney Morning Herald. According to the SMH website, more than 2 million residents shut off their lights and caused a 10.2% drop in energy usage across the city.

The Star hopes to replicate the results. Pretty powerful stuff, I must say. If there is anything that could be improved about the execution, it would be allowing people to embed the film on their own sites.

Because we on the Web like pictures: Flickr photos from Iowa on caucus day.