Archives for posts with tag: Processing

Over the weekend, I went to Jer Thorp’s Processing and data visualization workshop to dig deeper into the program.

While I don’t have new code to show yet, today I started looking for additional learning resources. Artist Marius Watz is publishing a free series of Processing primers on Modelab. The examples are fully commented, so even if you’re fairly new, it’s easy to follow along.

Daniel Shiffman, who wrote “Learning Processing: A Beginner’s Guide to Programming Images, Animation, and Interaction,” is planning a new book, due to be published this summer. It’s on Kickstarter:

Daniel’s got tutorials and excerpts from his current book online for those curious about his writing style and looking for additional examples to learn from.

Have some additional sites and sample files you’d like to share? Leave a note and help create a standing resource.

I don’t know about you, but December’s been pretty crazy for me. Between trying to maintain a healthy work-life balance (yeah, right) and trying to learn new things, I was shocked to realize Christmas is next week.

Egad.

Nevertheless, I’ve a little treat for you: Do-it-yourself polka dotted Christmas wrap and digital wallpaper, made with Processing. A sample’s below.

Take your pick of default sizes: 960 x 600 pixels or 1280 x 800 pixels.
Christmas polka dots
I learned a few things while making this project:

  • What they say about coding is true: You’re more apt to learn something if you’ve got a project in mind.
  • The initial bits of Processing are pretty easy to understand. But then there’s trying to grok random (not so bad) and shuffle (oy).
  • Coffee is good. Sleep is better.

To try Processing for yourself, copy my code from Github and paste it into the Processing.js Web IDE, or download Processing and tweak it locally.

Creative Commons LicenseThe code is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

polka dotsSee those dots? They’re not drawn. I programmed them using a 2D and 3D development environment called Processing.

It may not look like much, but it’s a start, thanks to a workshop taught by artist and instructor Jer Thorp, who’s currently Data Artist in Residence at The New York Times.

Sounds like a very cool job to me.

Meanwhile, this week’s assignment is to build on some of the workshop exercises — and to figure out how to export the files to my server so you can interact with them.

growing boxes